Cornell Law Review Volume 100 Issue 5

Copyright Trust

Collaborative production of expressive content accounts for an evergrowing number of copyrighted works. Indeed, in the age of content sharing and peer production, collaborative efforts may have become the paradigmatic form of authorship. Surprisingly, though, copyright law continues to view the single-author model as the dominant model of peer production. Copyright law’s approach to authorship is currently based on a […]

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Anti-Impunity and the Turn to Criminal Law in Human Rights

Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, the human rights movement has been almost synonymous with the fight against impunity. Today, to support human rights means to favor criminal accountability for those individuals who have violated international human rights or humanitarian law. It also means to be against amnesty laws that might preclude such accountability. This Article both chronicles and […]

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Personal Jurisdiction and the “Interwebs”

For nearly twenty years, lower courts and scholars have struggled to figure out how personal jurisdiction doctrine should apply in the Internet age. When does virtual conduct make someone amenable to jurisdiction in any particular forum? The classic but largely discredited response by courts has been to give primary consideration to a commercial Web site’s interactivity. That approach […]

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Cover Your Webcam: The ECPA’s Lack of Protection Against Software that Could Be Watching You

To read the complete Note, click “VIEW PDF” below.

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Rewriting the Overtime Dialogue: Why Misclassified Reality Television Producers are Entitled to only Half-Time Damages

To read the complete Note, click “View PDF” below.

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