Cornell Law Review Volume 93 Issue 4

Grand Jury Discretion and Constitutional Design

The grand jury possesses an unqualified power to decline to indict— despite probable cause that alleged criminal conduct has occurred. A grand jury might exercise this power, for example, to disagree with the wisdom of a criminal law or its application to a particular defendant. A grand jury might also use its discretionary power to “send a message” […]

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Can Law Manage Competitive Energy Markets?

Over the last three decades, the world’s industrialized democracies have introduced competition into previously noncompetitive, regulated markets. While this deregulatory trend is by no means absolute or uniform, what were once tightly regulated airline, banking, minerals, telephone, gas, and electric markets are now far more open and less regulated than ever before. Where governments once favored state ownership or intrusive public […]

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Striking a Better Public-Private Balance in Forum Non Conveniens

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Restitution and the Lacey Act: New Solutions, Old Remedies

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The Quantitative Moment and the Qualitative Opportunity: Legal Studies of Judicial Decision Making

To read the complete Book Review, click “VIEW PDF” below. 

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