Cornell Law Review Volume 93 Issue 2

Standing, Injury in Fact, and Private Rights

Under current law, a plaintiff has standing to bring suit only upon alleging an injury in fact. The Supreme Court has noted that this factual injury requirement is necessary to preserve the separation of powers by limiting courts to their historical function of resolving only the rights of individuals. But, despite this stated purpose, the Court has […]

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It’s a Wonderful Life

“It’s a Wonderful Life,” the title of Frank Capra’s classic 1946 movie, seems to encapsulate a fundamental all-American conviction. Unsurprisingly, several courts and jurists have applied the movie-title maxim as the ultimate retort to one of the most intriguing questions in modern tort discourse: Is it possible to say that a severely disabled child has been harmed […]

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The Obstruction of Justice Nexus Requirement After Arthur Andersen and Sarbanes-Oxley

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The Case of the Missing Shareholders: A New Restriction on Honest Services Fraud in United States v. Brown

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An Insider’s Look at the War on Terrorism

To read the complete Book Review, click “VIEW PDF” below.

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