Cornell Law Review Volume 104 Issue 3

Energy Exactions

Exactions are demands levied on residential or commercial developers to force them, rather than a municipality, to bear the costs of new infrastructure. Local governments commonly use them to address the burdens that growth places on schools, transportation, water, and sewers. But exactions almost never address energy needs, even though local land use decisions can […]

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How Essential Are Standard-Essential Patents?

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Suicide and Euthanasia: The International Perspective on The Right to Die

Several countries across the globe have weighed their interests in preserving life, in preventing suicide, and in allowing terminally ill patients to end their lives at their own discretion with, or without, the help of a physician. This Note will highlight the inconsistencies in jurisdictions that treat suicidal ideations both criminally and medically, and ultimately […]

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The Fair Labor Standards Act at 80: Everything Old is New Again

On the eightieth anniversary of the federal wage and hour statute, the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (FLSA), critics warn that it cannot keep pace with shifting business trends. More and more individuals engage in “contract work,” some of which takes place in the much publicized “gig economy.” These work arrangements raise questions about […]

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On The Basis of Sex(ual Orientation or Gender Identity): Bringing Queer Equity to School with Title IX

A transgender fourth-grader’s teacher refuses to address her by her preferred name and gender. A lesbian high-school student’s sexual education class does not teach her about topics relevant to her experience as a queer woman. A gay male college student’s campus does not have LGBT-specific post-sexual assault care. Under a formal equality approach to Title […]

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