Cornell Law Review Volume 102 Issue 3

THE “SMART” FOURTH AMENDMENT

“Smart” devices radiate data, exposing a continuous, intimate, and revealing pattern of daily life. Billions of sensors collect data from smartphones, smart homes, smart cars, medical devices, and an evolving assortment of consumer and commercial products. But, what are these data trails to the Fourth Amendment? Does data emanating from devices on or about our […]

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THE PRESIDENT’S POWER TO TAX

Existing statutes give the President and his Treasury Department broad authority to implement important elements of the administration’s tax agenda without further congressional action. And yet only occasionally does the executive branch exercise this statutory “power to tax.” Instead, the President often asks Congress to pass revenue-raising measures achieving what the President and his Treasury […]

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DE-POLICING

Critics have long claimed that when the law regulates police behavior it inadvertently reduces officer aggressiveness, thereby increasing crime. This hypothesis has taken on new significance in recent years as prominent politicians and law enforcement leaders have argued that increased oversight of police officers in the wake of the events in Ferguson, Missouri has led […]

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INFORMATION GATHERING IN THE ERA OF MOBILE TECHNOLOGY: TOWARDS A LIBERAL RIGHT TO RECORD

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CROSS-MARKET MERGERS IN HEALTHCARE: ADAPTING ANTITRUST REGULATION TO ADDRESS A GROWING CONCERN

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