Volume 103 Issue 4 Cornell Law Review
Volume 103 Issue 4

Benefit Corporations: A Proposal for Assessing Liability in Benefit Enforcement Proceedings

To read the complete note, click “VIEW PDF” below.  

Read More :: View PDF

“Making America Safe Again”: The Proper Interpretation of § 1101(A)(43)(S) of the Immigration and Nationality Act from Both a Chevron and a Public Policy Perspective

To read the complete note, click “VIEW PDF” below.

Read More :: View PDF

The Maternal Dilemma

This article questions the sufficiency of contemporary parental policies in undermining the gendered division of care-work at home. It reveals that despite the optimistic expectations that accompanied the enactment of gender-neutral leave legislation such as the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), and the provision of equal care opportunities for men, a marked gap separates […]

Read More :: View PDF

Lawyers’ Abuse of Technology

The Article is a thorough analysis of how the current scheme for regulating lawyers has failed to adapt to technology and why that failure is disastrous. It discusses (1) why technology, electronic communications, and social media require specialized attention in lawyer regulation, (2) what mechanisms can be harnessed to meet this need, and (3) the […]

Read More :: View PDF

Divide & Concur: Separate Opinions & Legal Change

To the extent concurring opinions elicit commentary at all, it is largely contempt. They are condemned for muddying the clarity of the law, fracturing the court, and diminishing the authoritative voice of the majority. But what if this neglect, or even disdain, of concurring opinions is off the mark? In this article, we argue for […]

Read More :: View PDF

The Rights of Marriage: Obergefell, Din, and the Future of Constitutional Family Law

In the summer of 2015 the United States Supreme Court handed down two groundbreaking constitutional family law decisions. One decision became famous overnight: Obergefell v. Hodges declared that same-sex couples have the constitutional right to marry. The other, Kerry v. Din, went largely overlooked. That later case concerned not the right to marry but the […]

Read More :: View PDF

International Cybertorts: Expanding State Accountability in Cyberspace

States are not being held accountable for the vast majority of their harmful cyberoperations, largely because classifications created in physical space do not map well onto the cyber domain. Most injurious and invasive cyberoperations are not cybercrimes and do not constitute cyberwarfare, nor are states extending existing definitions of wrongful acts permitting countermeasures to cyberoperations […]

Read More :: View PDF

The Central Claiming Renaissance

The Supreme Court has recently reinvigorated the law of patentable subject matter. But beneath the headlines proclaiming the return of limits to patent eligibility, a more profound shift has taken place: central claiming is reborn. The Court’s eligibility cases are significant outliers compared to today’s run-of-the-mill patent law because claim language plays little role in […]

Read More :: View PDF

Using Daubert to Evaluate Evidence-Based Sentencing

To read the complete note, click “VIEW PDF” below.

Read More :: View PDF

The Partiality Norm: Systematic Deference in the Office of Legal Counsel

To read the complete note, click “VIEW PDF” below.

Read More :: View PDF